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ODNI releases assessment on Global Water Security

April 4, 2012 Comments off

ODNI releases assessment on Global Water Security (PDF)
Source: Office of the Director of National Intelligence

While wars over water are unlikely within the next 10 years, water challenges – shortages, poor water quality, floods – will likely increase the risk of instability and state failure, exacerbate regional tensions, and distract countries from working with the United States on important policy objectives, according to an assessment prepared by the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC).

The Intelligence Community Assessment (ICA) “Global Water Security,” was prepared by the National Intelligence Council (NIC) of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and released by the ODNI today.

The ICA is based on a National Intelligence Estimate (NIE) requested by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton to assess the impact of global water issues on U.S. national security interests over the next 30 years. It is intended to support a greater number of policymakers who share the concern that pressures on existing water resources may exacerbate local and regional tensions, perhaps to the point of conflict.

The ICA also notes that, as a consequence of water challenges globally, the demand for U.S. assistance and expertise will increase providing the U.S. with opportunities for leadership and forestalling other actors from achieving the same influence at U.S. expense.

+ Full Report (PDF)

Unclassified Statement for the Record on the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence

February 1, 2012 Comments off

Unclassified Statement for the Record on the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (PDF)
Source: Office of the Director of National Intelligence (James R. Clapper)

This statement provides extensive detail about numerous state and nonstate actors, crosscutting political, economic, and military developments and transnational trends, all of which constitute our nation‟s strategic and tactical landscape. Although I believe that counterterrorism, counterproliferation, cybersecurity, and counterintelligence are at the immediate forefront of our security concerns, it is virtually impossible to rank—in terms of long-term importance—the numerous, potential threats to US national security. The United States no longer faces—as in the Cold War—one dominant threat. Rather, it is the multiplicity and interconnectedness of potential threats—and the actors behind them—that constitute our biggest challenge. Indeed, even the four categories noted above are also inextricably linked, reflecting a quickly changing international environment of rising new powers, rapid diffusion of power to nonstate actors and ever greater access by individuals and small groups to lethal technologies. We in the Intelligence Community believe it is our duty to work together as an integrated team to understand and master this complexity. By providing better strategic and tactical intelligence, we can partner more effectively with other Government officials at home and abroad to protect our vital national interests.

Report on Security Clearance Determinations for Fiscal Year 2010

September 26, 2011 Comments off

Report on Security Clearance Determinations for Fiscal Year 2010 (PDF)
Source: Office of the Director of National Intelligence (via Federation of American Scientists)

The number of individuals with a security clearance is currently collected biannually from agencies. AprocesshasnowbeendevelopedforagenciestoreportquarterlytotheOfficeof the Director National Intelligence (ODNI) the total number of clearances categorized by employee type and clearance level so that the data requested under the Act may be provided in future reports with the required fidelity.
(A) Number of government employees who –
(i) held a security clearance at such level as of October 1, 2010;

  • Confidential/Secret: 2,166,679
  • Top Secret (collateral and TS/SCI): 666,008

(ii) were approved for a security clearance at such level during the preceding fiscal year.

  • Confidential/Secret: 512,076*
  • Top Secret (collateral and TS/SCI): 130,755*

(B) Number of contractors who –
(i) held a security clearance at such level as of October 1, 2010;

  • Confidential/Secret: 541 ,097
  • Top Secret (collateral and TS/SCI): 524,990

(ii) were approved for a security clearance at such level during the preceding fiscal year.

  • Confidential/Secret: 512,076*
  • Top Secret (collateral and TS/SCI): 130,755*

ODNI Report: Intelligence Community Reduces Security Clearance Processing Time

September 22, 2011 Comments off

ODNI Report: Intelligence Community Reduces Security Clearance Processing Time (PDF)
Source: Office of the Director of National Intelligence

The Intelligence Community (IC) continues to reduce its security clearance processing times on par with the improvements seen across all government agencies, according to a new report released today by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) on security clearance determinations.

The Congressionally mandated Report on Security Clearance Determinations said that significant progress has been made in recent years to improve the timeliness of the investigative and adjudication processes, despite some unique challenges and additional vetting in some cases where individuals have much sought after skills.

According to the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act (IRTPA) Title III 2010 Annual Report released in February 2011, the average government security clearance took just 53 days to process in 2010, exceeding the IRTPA standard of 60 days required for 90 percent of all applications. In 2006, the average processing time for initial security clearances was 165 days.

The new annual report is required under the 2010 Intelligence Authorization Act (IAA) and beginning in the 2011 Fiscal Year, it includes several new reporting and timeliness metrics, and collection efforts, which are different than the previous IRTPA goals. Among the reporting requirements is the first-ever government-wide inventory of security clearances held by federal employees, contractors and consultants. As of Oct. 1, 2010, more than 2.8 million federal employees and 1.4 million contractors and consultants held security clearances.

+ Full Report (PDF)

Statement for the Record on the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community for the Senate Committee on Armed Services

March 14, 2011 Comments off

Statement for the Record on the Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community for the Senate Committee on Armed Services (PDF)
Source: Office of the Director of National Intelligence (Director James R. Clapper)

This statement goes into extensive detail about numerous state and non-state actors, crosscutting political, economic, and military developments and transnational trends, all of which constitute our nation’s strategic and tactical landscape. Although I believe that counterterrorism, counterproliferation, and counterintelligence are at the immediate forefront of our securitity concerns, it is virtually impossible to rank — in tetrms of long-term important — the numerous, potential threats to U.S. national security. The United States no longer faces — as in the Cold War — one dominant threat. Rather, it is the multiplicity and interconnectedness of potential threats– and the actors behind them — that constitute our biggest challenge. Indeed, even the three categories noted above are also inextricably linked, reflecting a quickly-changing international environment of rising new powers, rapid diffusion of power to non-state actors and even greater access by individuals and small groups to lethal technologies. We in the Intelligence Community belive it is our duty to work together as an integrated team to understand and master this complexity. By providing better strategic and tactical intelligence, we can partner more effectively with Government officials at home and abroad to protect our vital national interests.

National Security Space Strategy (Unclassified Summary)

February 22, 2011 Comments off

National Security Space Strategy (Unclassified Summary) (PDF)
Source: U.S. Department of Defense and Office of the Director of National Intelligence

During the past 50 years, U.S. leadership in space activities has benefited the global economy, enhanced our national security, strengthened international relationships, advanced scientific discovery, and improved our way of life.

Space capabilities provide the United States and our allies unprecedented advantages in national decision-making, military operations, and homeland security. Space systems provide national security decision-makers with unfettered global access and create a decision advantage by enabling a rapid and tailored response to global challenges. Moreover, space systems are vital to monitoring strategic and military developments as well as supporting treaty monitoring and arms control verification. Space systems are also critical in our ability to respond to natural and man-made disasters and monitor longterm environmental trends. Space systems allow people and governments around the world to see with clarity, communicate with certainty, navigate with accuracy, and operate with assurance.

Maintaining the benefits afforded to the United States by space is central to our national security, but an evolving strategic environment increasingly challenges U.S. space advantages. Space, a domain that no nation owns but on which all rely, is becoming increasingly congested, contested, and competitive. These challenges, however, also present the United States with opportunities for leadership and partnership. Just as the United States helped promote space security in the 20th century, we will build on this foundation to embrace the opportunities and address the challenges of this century. The National Security Space Strategy charts a path for the next decade to respond to the current and projected space strategic environment. Leveraging emerging opportunities will strengthen the U.S. national security space posture while maintaining and enhancing the advantages the United States gains from space.

Our strategy requires active U.S. leadership enabled by an approach that updates, balances, and integrates all of the tools of U.S. power. The Department of Defense (DoD) and the Intelligence Community (IC), in coordination with other departments and agencies, will implement this strategy by using it to inform planning, programming, acquisition, operations, and analysis.