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Facts of the catch: occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities to fishing workers, 2003–2009

August 18, 2012 Comments off

Facts of the catch: occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities to fishing workers, 2003–2009
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Fishers and related fishing workers1 deal with a set of working conditions unique among all other occupations. This occupation is characterized by strenuous work, long hours, seasonal employment, and some of the most hazardous conditions in the workforce.2 These workers are often at sea for weeks or months at a time, sometimes having to stand on deck, fishing for long periods with little or no sleep. They are constantly being tossed around by wind and rough seas, with water in their face and under their feet, which adds an element of balance to the skills needed to do their job safely. Weather does not stop production, and given that these workers do not work in a factory or office building, it increases the unpredictability of their working conditions. Access to on-site medical care for these workers is limited to the knowledge of those on the boat with them or the response of the Coast Guard.

Thanks to television shows such as Deadliest Catch, Lobstermen, Swords, Rajin Cajuns, Hook Line and Sisters, Wicked Tuna, Big Shrimpin’, and Toughest Tribes,3 viewers can see the hazards these workers face first hand. But what do the numbers show? Fishers and related fishing workers have had the highest fatal injury rate of any occupation since 2005. Their rate of fatal injury in 2009 was 203.6 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers, more than 50 times the all-worker rate of 3.5. From 2003 to 2009, an average of 48 fishers and related fishing workers died each year as a result of an injury incurred on the job.

There were approximately 31,000 people employed as fishers and related fishing workers in 2009.4 This issue of Beyond the Numbers looks at data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities program on fishers and related fishing workers for the period from 2003 to 2009.Although this report focuses primarily on fatal injuries among workers in this occupation, for context, it begins with some information on the nonfatal injuries and illnesses experienced by these workers. This is followed by a detailed description of what the data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) show about fatal injuries to fishers and related fishing workers during the 2003–2009 period. The final section gives an overview of the fatal injuries that occurred among a subset of the fishers and related fishing workers in the private shellfish fishing industry, including crab fishing, lobster fishing, and shrimp fishing, in order to provide more insight into the special hazards these workers endure.

An overview of U.S. occupational employment and wages in 2011

July 28, 2012 Comments off

An overview of U.S. occupational employment and wages in 2011

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

A substantial share of U.S. employment in May 2011 was concentrated in a relatively small number of occupations. Just 10 occupations made up more than 20 percent of total employment, and the 20 largest occupations made up nearly one-third of employment—more than 41 million jobs. Most of these large occupations had below-average wages, as did most of the occupations with the highest job gains and losses between May 2007 and May 2011. Growth in the healthcare industry helped to shape employment gains in individual occupations, while construction and production occupations were concentrated in shrinking industries. Although the overall occupational structure of the U.S. economy generally reflected that of the private sector, education and protective service occupations were more prevalent in the public sector, particularly in local government.

This issue of Beyond the Numbers uses data from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program to provide an overview of U.S. occupational employment and wages in May 2011. The first section presents employment and wage data for wage and salary workers in the largest U.S. occupations and selected occupational groups. The subsequent sections highlight occupations with the highest job gains and losses between May 2007 and May 2011, occupations prevalent in growing and shrinking industries, and occupational employment comparisons between the public and private sector.

Persons born in the latter years of the baby boom held 11.3 jobs from ages 18 to 46

July 27, 2012 Comments off

Persons born in the latter years of the baby boom held 11.3 jobs from ages 18 to 46

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The average person born in the latter years of the baby boom (1957-1964) held 11.3 jobs from age 18 to age 46, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nearly half of these jobs were held from ages 18 to 24.

These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979; a survey of 9,964 men and women who were ages 14 to 22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 45 to 53 when interviewed most recently in 2010-11. These respondents were born in the years 1957 to 1964, the latter years of the "baby boom" that occurred in the United States from 1946 to 1964. The survey spans more than 3 decades and provides information on work and nonwork experiences, education, training, income and assets, health, and other characteristics. The information provided by respondents, who were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1994 and biennially since 1994, can be considered representative of all men and women born in the late 1950s and early 1960s and living in the United States when the survey began in 1979.

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Summer 2012

July 2, 2012 Comments off

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Summer 2012
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

More than play: Three careers in sports
Dennis Vilorio
 Snippet     How to best view PDF files PDF (922K)

Electric vehicle careers: On the road to change
James Hamilton
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High wages after high school—without a bachelor’s degree
Elka Torpey
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My Career
My career: Manager
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Grab Bag
Brief items of interest to counselors and students.
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You're a what?
You’re a what?  Tower technician
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Dennis Vilorio

OOChart
Consumer spending: Comparing four countries
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Monthly Labor Review — June 2012

July 1, 2012 Comments off

Monthly Labor Review — June 2012
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Time use of youths by immigrant and native-born parents: ATUS results
Yelizavetta Kofman and Suzanne M. Bianchi
Summary | Full text in PDF

Which industries are shifting the Beveridge curve?
Regis Barnichon, Michael Elsby, Bart Hobijn, and Aysegül Sahin
Summary | Full text in PDF

The hard truth about telecommuting
Mary C. Noonan and Jennifer L. Glass
Summary | Full text in PDF

Industry shifts in hours and nonfatal work injuries and illnesses, 2003–2008
Alexander Measure
Summary | Full text in PDF

Green Technologies and Practices — August 2011

June 30, 2012 Comments off

Green Technologies and Practices — August 2011
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

About three-quarters of business establishments reported the use of at least one green technology or practice during August 2011, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Green technologies and practices (GTP) are those that lessen the environmental impact of an establishment’s operations. About 854,700 jobs, representing approximately 0.7 percent of total U.S. employment, were held by workers who spent more than half of their time involved in green technologies and practices in August 2011. Over one-quarter of these GTP jobs were in building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations or in installation, maintenance, and repair occupations.a

How have health benefits changed in state and local governments from 1998 to 2011?

June 25, 2012 Comments off

How have health benefits changed in state and local governments from 1998 to 2011?
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Health insurance coverage for state and local government employees has undergone significant changes over the past decade. Although state and local governments still provide comprehensive coverage to most employees, the total percentage of employees who are covered by insurance has declined. In addition, a higher proportion of health care costs have shifted to employees, and a larger percentage of employees are now enrolled in contributory plans that require employees to pay premiums. Coverage for benefits has also changed; more employees have restricted health plans or plans with limited coverage, requiring them to pay deductibles or coinsurance.

This issue of Beyond the Numbers looks at changes in health care plan participant provisions for state and local government employees in 1998 and 2011. Detailed provisions on state and local government benefits are collected periodically in the National Compensation Survey (NCS).1 Data for 2011 are now available in the NCS; this is the first detailed study of government benefits since 1998.2 Estimates of 2011 state and local government benefit provisions in this issue are from “National Compensation Survey: Health Plan Provisions in State and Local Government in the United States, 2011,” available online athttp://www.bls.gov/ebs/detailedprovisions/2011/ebbl0049.pdf. Estimates of 1998 state and local government benefit provisions in this issue are from “Employee Benefits in State and Local Governments, 1998,” available online at http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ebs/sp/ebbl0018.pdf. Estimates of 2011 benefit provisions in this issue are from “National Compensation Survey: Employee Benefits in the United States, March 2011,” available online at http://www.bls.gov/ebs/benefits/2011/ebbl0048.pdf.

See the Glossary for definitions of the terms used in this issue.

American Time Use Survey — 2011 Results

June 25, 2012 Comments off

American Time Use Survey — 2011 Results
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2011, 16 percent of the U.S. civilian noninstitutional population age 15 and over were eldercare providers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. This and other information about eldercare providers and the time they spent providing care were collected for the first time in the 2011 American Time Use Survey (ATUS). This release also includes the average amount of time per day in 2011 that individuals spent in various activities, such as working, household activities, childcare, and leisure and sports activities. For a further description of ATUS data, concepts, and methodology, see the Technical Note.

Spotlight on Statistics: Fashion

June 24, 2012 Comments off

Spotlight on Statistics: Fashion
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Throughout history, fashion has greatly influenced the “fabric” of societies all over the world. What people wear often characterizes who they are and what they do for a living. As Mark Twain once wrote, “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

The fashion industry is a global industry, where fashion designers, manufacturers, merchandisers, and retailers from all over the world collaborate to design, manufacture, and sell clothing, shoes, and accessories. The industry is characterized by short product life cycles, erratic consumer demand, an abundance of product variety, and complex supply chains.

In this Spotlight, we take a look at the fashion industry’s supply chain—including import and producer prices, employment in the apparel manufacturing and fashion-related wholesale and retail trade industries, labor productivity in the manufacturing sector and in selected textile and apparel industries, and consumer prices and expenditures on apparel-related items.

Employment and enrollment of young male veterans in the 2007–2009 recession

June 23, 2012 Comments off

Employment and enrollment of young male veterans in the 2007–2009 recession
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2007, nearly 1.5 million veterans had served in the United States Armed Forces since September 2001. By the end of 2007, the United States began a long recession, in which young workers faced particularly large employment losses. The chart compares the employment, educational, and training experiences of young male veterans and nonveterans during the January 2008–June 2009 time period, which coincides with the recession that began in December 2007 and continued through June 2009.

International air passenger fares shrug off the recession

June 20, 2012 Comments off

International air passenger fares shrug off the recession
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Passenger fares for flights to and from the United States recently experienced a strong recovery after recording large decreases during the recent global recession. For the United States, the recent recession began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009.1 After a decade of steady increases, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Import and Export Air Passenger Fares Indexes declined sharply between the recession years 2008 and 2009. Following the recession, the industry has shown signs of recovery, with ticket prices increasing in the past 2 years. An analysis of the BLS international airfare indexes helps to shed some light on the factors that led to this rebound.2

BLS publishes price indexes that track general trends in international air travel to and from the United States. The BLS Import Air Passenger Fares Index tracks changes in the fares paid to foreign air carriers by U.S. residents, and the Export Air Passenger Fares Index tracks changes in the fares paid to U.S. carriers by foreign residents. These indexes were first published on a quarterly basis in the late 1980s; since March 2001, BLS has published the air passenger fares indexes on a monthly basis. The indexes also track airfares by region, such as Europe, Latin America, and Asia.

Monthly Labor Review — May 2012

June 20, 2012 Comments off

Monthly Labor Review — May 2012
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Articles

Older men: pushed into retirement in the 1970s and 1980s by the baby boomers?
Diane J. Macunovich
Summary | Full text in PDF
Older workers and short-term jobs: employment patterns and determinants
Kevin E. Cahill, Michael D. Giandrea, and Joseph F. Quinn
Summary | Full text in PDF

Measuring annual change in household wealth with the Consumer Expenditure Survey
Jeffrey D. Lundy
Summary | Full text in PDF

Regional Report

Multiple jobholding in states in 2011
Jim Campbell
Summary | Full text in PDF

Employment, college enrollment, and training of young male veterans and nonveterans during the recent recession

June 17, 2012 Comments off

Employment, college enrollment, and training of young male veterans and nonveterans during the recent recession
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2007, nearly 1.5 million veterans had served in the United States Armed Forces since September 2001.1 By the end of 2007, the United States began a long recession, in which young workers faced particularly large employment losses.2 This analysis focuses on labor market, educational, and training experiences of young male veterans and nonveterans during the January 2008-to-June 2009 time period. This period coincides with the recent recession that began in December 2007 and continued through June 2009.3

Data in this article are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The NLSY97 is a nationally representative sample of 8,984 men and women, who were born in the years 1980 to 1984 and were living in the United States at the time of the initial survey. Survey participants were first interviewed in 1997 when they were ages 12 to 17 and have been interviewed annually. Survey participants turned 24 to 28 years old in 2008. Veterans in the analysis are defined as those who had served in the military and were not on active duty at any point during the January 2008-to-June 2009 period.4 Nonveterans are defined as those who never served in the military.

The NLSY97 includes detailed employment, schooling, and training histories, as well as a cognitive test score based on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).5 A summary percentile score created by NLS staff provides a math and verbal aptitude score similar to the Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) score used in the military to help determine enlistment qualifications.

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers 2011

May 26, 2012 Comments off

Labor Force Characteristics of Foreign-born Workers 2011
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The unemployment rate for the foreign born was 9.1 percent in 2011, down from 9.8 percent in 2010, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The jobless rate of the native born was 8.9 percent in 2011, compared with 9.6 percent in the prior year. The foreign born made up 15.9 percent of the labor force.

Data on nativity are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of approximately 60,000 households. The foreign born are persons who reside in the United States but who were born outside the country or one of its outlying areas to parents who were not U.S. citizens. The foreign born include legally-admitted immigrants, refugees, temporary residents such as students and temporary workers, and undocumented immigrants. The survey data, however, do not separately identify the numbers of persons in these categories.

Energy prices jump while food prices show modest increases

May 23, 2012 Comments off

Energy prices jump while food prices show modest increases
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of the average change over time in the prices paid by urban consumers for a market basket of consumer goods and services.1 Produced monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the CPI uses a “market basket,” or a sample of goods and services that consumers purchase for day-to-day living, and weighs each item on the basis of the amount of spending reported by a sample of families and individuals. Widely used as a measure of inflation, the CPI provides information about price changes in the nation’s economy and can be used by government, business, labor, and private individuals as a guide to making economic decisions.

Over the last 12 months, the index for all items less food and energy has slowly accelerated. In contrast, the all-items index has decelerated since a 12-month increase of 3.9 percent in September 2011. The September 2011 increase capped a run of steady acceleration in the all-items index that began in December 2010. Despite the contrast, the all-items index increased at a higher rate than the index for all items less food and energy in the first quarter of 2012. This summary compares price changes in the CPI for detailed categories of goods and services over the first quarter of 2012 with those in 2011.

Profiles of Significant Collective Bargaining Disputes of 2011

May 23, 2012 Comments off

Profiles of Significant Collective Bargaining Disputes of 2011
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2011, there were 19 major work stoppages (strikes, lockouts) involving 1,000 or more employees, with 2 of the 3 largest stoppages widely considered “lockouts” by media reports.1 A lockout is a temporary withholding or denial of employment during a labor dispute and is initiated by the management of a company. This article examines the collective bargaining issues of the three largest work stoppages of 2011 in terms of lost workdays.

Life Insurance Benefits: Variations Based on Workers’ Earnings and Work Schedules

May 21, 2012 Comments off

Life Insurance Benefits: Variations Based on Workers’ Earnings and Work Schedules
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

According to data from the National Compensation Survey, nearly two-thirds of private industry workers were offered life insurance benefits by their employers in March 2011; of these, 97 percent chose to enroll in this benefit. This high “take-up” rate reflects that only 5 percent of private industry employees in basic life insurance plans were required to pay part of the cost of coverage. Life insurance plans were much more likely to be offered to full-time workers than to part-time workers, as well as to workers in higher earnings brackets, compared with those in lower brackets. These differences in access result in differences in the participation rates reported by work schedule and earnings level.

Chart 1 shows that the difference in the rates of access and participation among full-time and part-time workers is substantial: 73 percent of full-time workers had access to life insurance benefits plans through their employers, and 71 percent participated in such plans. By contrast, only 14 percent of part-time workers had access to life insurance benefits, and 13 percent participated.

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2011

April 30, 2012 Comments off

Employment Characteristics of Families — 2011
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2011, 11.5 percent of families included an unemployed person, falling from a peak of 12.4 percent in 2010, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Of the nation’s 78.4 million families, 79.8 percent had at least one employed member in 2011.

These data on employment, unemployment, and family relationships are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of approximately 60,000 households. Families are classified either as married-couple families or as families maintained by women or men without spouses present.

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2011 High School Graduates

April 20, 2012 Comments off

College Enrollment and Work Activity of 2011 High School Graduates
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In October 2011, 68.3 percent of 2011 high school graduates were enrolled in colleges or universities, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Recent high school graduates not enrolled in college in October 2011 were more likely than enrolled graduates to be working or looking for work (68.7 percent compared with 38.8 percent).

Occuational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2012

April 5, 2012 Comments off

Occupational Outlook Quarterly — Spring 2012

Bureau of Labor Statistics

The 2010–20 job outlook in brief — A special issue

The 2010–20 job outlook in brief
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Occupations
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—–

You’re a what? Process server
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Brief items of interest to counselors and students.
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